Practical Access Podcast

S:2 E:11: Questions from the listeners - happiness, what we are reading, jobs of the future

May 29, 2020 Season 2 Episode 11
Practical Access Podcast
S:2 E:11: Questions from the listeners - happiness, what we are reading, jobs of the future
Chapters
Practical Access Podcast
S:2 E:11: Questions from the listeners - happiness, what we are reading, jobs of the future
May 29, 2020 Season 2 Episode 11

Drs. Rebecca Hines and Lisa Dieker, UCF faculty, share their thoughts on questions posed by listeners related to life and disability. This episode focuses on random questions asked from what to do if you are having a bad day to what are we reading to what are jobs of the future.  We look forward to future questions to give our best practical advice. 

Show Notes Transcript

Drs. Rebecca Hines and Lisa Dieker, UCF faculty, share their thoughts on questions posed by listeners related to life and disability. This episode focuses on random questions asked from what to do if you are having a bad day to what are we reading to what are jobs of the future.  We look forward to future questions to give our best practical advice. 

Lisa Dieker:

Welcome to practical access. I'm Lisa Dieker.

Rebecca Hines:

And Rebecca Hines. And today, Lisa, I understand, we're going to do a run through of some of the questions that we've received and give our, our responses. So I can't wait to hear what we have to answer.

Lisa Dieker:

All right. So I get to throw them all out, because I have the questions in front of me. So one of the greatest challenges to our field of special education at this time,

Rebecca Hines:

is for starting with an easy one. So it's interesting. I think about that all the time. And I think I've said podcasts. I think the biggest threats to education in general is not it's not adapting, you know, more quickly, and hopefully now, as a result of this need to adapt quickly, we all have a sense of that. But in the case of kids with disabilities in particular, I think we all

Lisa Dieker:

Well, and I'll go along that line, but a little bit different pathway, I think we haven't yet taken advantage of all the knowledge that neuroscience learning sciences the medical profession has given us. And I think we're still relying on paper pencil verbal responses from tests that were normed in the 1900s, that we really need to be thinking about looking at some more solid Period, that alone highly qualified.

Rebecca Hines:

I do think that as people are actually there cutting back on, you know, hiring and a lot of places, I do think special ed probably has a stronger foothold in most, because we are, we are specialists and I think we need to embrace the idea of truly being specialists.

Lisa Dieker:

So this was a really random question is like, what do you do when you have a bad day? As a teacher or a parent? like wow, cry?

Rebecca Hines:

got a better idea? Well, it's interesting because one of our shared doctoral students is doing a dissertation right now on on stress and teacher stress and emotions, and kind of this interaction between all those things and you know, in the classroom, and how it impacts the kids, etc. And one of the things that she's found, so far that's been really interesting to me is this fact have these discussions in higher ed. Yeah, I left her self, don't take things personally, and save myself save my sanity, because I'm only going to be the best teacher I can. If I can hang on to my my sanity, I don't let people steal my joy. And I think that's what we have to remind ourselves.

Lisa Dieker:

Yeah, so I'll go along with that. And so I guess when you're stressed to smile, that's a good starting point, it may not be effective, but you can't feel any worse. And I'm really big on if you didn't have a bad day, you would know what a good one was. So I tend to be very glass half full, maybe even three quarters full kind of person that says, All right, this really stinks right don't really hold paper very often anymore, but I thought you know what, I'm a little bit tech note out, which is hard for me to say. So I have been reading a couple of books on time management now that shocks you. But specifically 1115 secrets successful people know about, about time management, and it's really successful people. But two that I like is successful people say yes, very

Rebecca Hines:

Well, it's really funny, and I guess instructional to me to hear you say that you're reading about time management since you best time manager. No. So I don't know if that's a refresher course for you. And maybe that's the key to being a better time management person, because I have never and likely will never be borrowing. Now, it may not come as a surprise to you, Lisa, that in

Lisa Dieker:

Well, I think our last little q&a session here, we'll wrap it up with I think this is a question I'll start by answering because I don't have an answer. And they'll give you a gift and process it, because it's a loaded, what subject areas will kids be taking in the future? I was like, oh, great crystal ball. So I, I actually think in the future, we will see more on emotional

Rebecca Hines:

Well, I think that's true. And I think in terms of the technology piece, I agree that it's not ocus. But I think that's going to be because we will now have a clear understanding that technology is just the tool, it's not a subject to teach. It's just the tool. So I do hope there's a de emphasis. And I hope we get away from always talking about everybody needs all this training and

Lisa Dieker:

Well those are our best answers we had for the questions, we forgive it. We hope you enjoyed this unique option of practical access. Please send us a Tweet @accesspractical with additional questions.