Practical Access Podcast

S:2 E:20 Persistence

July 10, 2020 Season 2 Episode 20
Practical Access Podcast
S:2 E:20 Persistence
Chapters
Practical Access Podcast
S:2 E:20 Persistence
Jul 10, 2020 Season 2 Episode 20

Join Drs. Rebecca Hines and Lisa Dieker as they share practical ideas related to helping children and students with disabilities preserver.  Ideas align with what we know about goal setting and grit.  Working hard produces strong outcomes and these high expectations for outcomes are critical for all people, including those with disabilities.  Please share questions you might have on Twitter @accesspractical

Show Notes Transcript

Join Drs. Rebecca Hines and Lisa Dieker as they share practical ideas related to helping children and students with disabilities preserver.  Ideas align with what we know about goal setting and grit.  Working hard produces strong outcomes and these high expectations for outcomes are critical for all people, including those with disabilities.  Please share questions you might have on Twitter @accesspractical

Unknown:

Welcome to practical

Rebecca Hines:

I'm Lisa Dieker. And I'm Rebecca Hines. And Lisa, I'm looking forward to today's question, and we're going to discuss that is,

Lisa Dieker:

well, so someone asked a great question that I'm curious to hear the answer to myself. So I'm gonna, I'm gonna lean into you first, my friend. It was how do I help my, my child with a disability, or student? Who gives up really quickly learn to persevere? Like, well, I'd like to know that answer for humans period, let alone for kids with disabilities. I know, it's

Rebecca Hines:

interesting, because, you know, there's been so much these last couple of years about that word, grit, which I think really speaks to the whole perseverance piece. And, you know, what do we do that lets us see and learn, you know how to stick with something until until we get the results that we want. My first thought is, is a simple one. And I don't know if I've stated it in our But in the classroom that looks like really breaking things down into really small pieces, and just verbally coaching and reinforcing. And it also, it also recognizes that sometimes kids might not meet that the first time. But continuing to go back to it. And back to it back to it. I have a really big scale example. But I'm curious to hear what you have to say about the top.

Lisa Dieker:

So I think, you know, you hit the nail on the head, first of all with grit and internal locus of control. And I think sometimes we we as parents, and we as teachers downplay the ability for kids to control themselves because of their disability, Oh, poor. And you know, I make that personal, oh, well, he has this right. And that's easy to do. I'm going to Guilty as charged to make mindset, whether it's a teacher or a parent, and say, yes, growth, but growth requires small steps, those micro steps, but always having a macro goal. And I think too many times for kids with disabilities, we just look into the next day. Like if I can just get them out of bed and brush their teeth. It's really great. But I would like to not have you have to go to the dentist so often. So

Rebecca Hines:

I think those are that's a good, that's a good example. I think, as teachers and parents, one of the critical things we can do to is to really model failure. So specifically, I know, in my own case, because I you know, taught in a self contained classroom taught with kids with some, you know, high needs, and who struggled and who didn't feel very good about themselves, because

Lisa Dieker:

Yeah, and I love your discussion there about, you know, approximation of practice that you can't be perfect the first time. That's how we, you know, I hate to tell you, but the first year as a teacher, I probably should have been sued. Some of you out there that are first year teachers, you're going to make mistakes. And I think that's what perseverance is about is making those send us any tweets @accesspractical