Practical Access Podcast

S:2 E:19: How does the IEP change over time?

July 08, 2020 Season 2 Episode 19
Practical Access Podcast
S:2 E:19: How does the IEP change over time?
Chapters
Practical Access Podcast
S:2 E:19: How does the IEP change over time?
Jul 08, 2020 Season 2 Episode 19

Drs. Rebecca Hines and Lisa Dieker, UCF faculty members, share their thoughts on how to IEP goals should progress over time.   The ideas shared emphasize a need for both independence and alignment. Once again, the focus is on students learning to advocate for their needs while fostering their ownership of their plan. We look forward to receiving your questions on Twitter @accesspratical

Show Notes Transcript

Drs. Rebecca Hines and Lisa Dieker, UCF faculty members, share their thoughts on how to IEP goals should progress over time.   The ideas shared emphasize a need for both independence and alignment. Once again, the focus is on students learning to advocate for their needs while fostering their ownership of their plan. We look forward to receiving your questions on Twitter @accesspratical

Lisa Dieker:

Welcome to practical access. I am Lisa Dieker.

Rebecca Hines:

And I'm Rebecca. Hines And Lisa, what's our topic?

Lisa Dieker:

Well, you know, it's a question that that I think it can be answered in 1000 ways. But how it was framed was how do you adjust? Or what do you put on your child or student's IEP as they get older? And I thought my first thought was, well, at a certain age, there is no IEP. So that's the first point I wanted to make is that, poof, it's gone. So I'm really big on gradual release,

Rebecca Hines:

Well, I think I'm, I mean, I definitely agree. And I think what you're describing there, what you're talking about there is this idea of, you know, kind of being this, this child, him or herself more power and control over is starting to take charge, basically, typically, in start expressing what their their future might be. So I think, you know, when we think about an IEP for kids

Lisa Dieker:

Yeah, you know, and I always like to really emphasize that it's a plan, but it's actually a program, you know, and if you think of a program, and I'll go to one of my fallbacks happen know a little bit about gymnastics, having lived with a gymnast my whole entire life, you know, you don't start by doing round up back handsprings and double backs on the floor. But you start with

Rebecca Hines:

And, you know, we've talked, both personally and in on podcasts about things like spelling, and I think that's a great example, a really good clear example, if we scale that back just a little bit to just communication in general, because for some kids, writing isn't going to be an important part of their future. Because they may be working just on communicating, just communicating

Lisa Dieker:

Trying to cross the street with 90%? accuracy? You're like, really? Yeah,

Rebecca Hines:

exactly. So it's just passed a little pass along. And I really, you know, kind of implore our colleagues, take a look critically at these IEP s, and ask yourself, Is this really, is there a practical piece to this? You know, is there something, you know that it's going to help a student long term, lifelong in that IP. And again, I realize there's been such an emphasis on academic

Lisa Dieker:

And I'm gonna, I'm going to talk to you from both parent and teacher perspective for a moment, I think that one of the things I think we don't do well is letting kids read their plans, it's their play and not ours, you know, and for them to say, I really don't know that I'll ever multiply. But I really understand multiplication, or I don't know that I'll ever, you know, be able to

Rebecca Hines:

Well, we know that hovering in general has, is in something that paraprofessionals have done with the very right desire to help support kids, and especially the absence of better understanding how to support kids, but definitely starting to scaffold away from the hovering part of it for sure. Even if we need that person in the room for support, you know, as needed. But that I

Lisa Dieker:

Yeah, and I'm getting my last slide out here, I think you did a great job of mentioning hovering. And I think that's true for parents, I think that's true for special ed teachers. And I'm even going to make a plea to our general ed teachers who sometimes think, Oh, well, I have a kid with this disability, I really need to help them, what we really need to do is help have them learn to

Rebecca Hines:

Well said,

Lisa Dieker:

Thank you. All right, well, so Becky, I know you're trying to take a little break this summer and be moms and relax ourselves. And so I think we have two more podcasts. And I think we're gonna end our last one with kind of things to kick you off for back to school. But if I'm correct, we're gonna then watch the fall off by highlighting various types of disabilities. Is that what we're

Rebecca Hines:

Yeah, I think I think it's a good time to take a deep dive into, you know, what are the what are what are the strategies for use with different types of kids? I think there's going to be a lot of interesting things to talk about in that area. Especially considering, again, all of the changes in our system and what, what methods are we hanging on to and have any new ones emerged?

Lisa Dieker:

Well, I think we're planning on guest experience Guest Access guests experience, episodes, something along that line, as as we move into the fall, so that we have lots of people representing those different topics, too. So get ready for season three. We have a couple of episodes to wrap up the season. And thanks for joining us today on us. You can send us a tweet